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Urge

urge

 

The word "urge" is used when there’s a strong feeling or a strong motivation. In some cases, "urge" is similar to the words "want" or "need."

In these sentences, the word "urge" is a noun:

  • He has a strong urge to join the military.
  • The students have an urge to do well on their tests.
  • Katrina is fighting the urge for a cigarette. (She wants a cigarette, but she is resisting her addiction.)
  • Bob felt an urge to buy some ice cream.
  • The urge to speed on an empty highway was the reason Chris got a speeding ticket.

In these sentences, the word "urge" is a verb:

  • Mr. Johnson is urging his employees to get flu shots this year.
  • The government is urging people to sign up for health insurance if they don’t have it already.
  • Wally’s parents urged him to take the job that was offered to him.
  • Maria always urges her children to do their best in school.
  • I urge you to start taking your schoolwork more seriously.

The word "urgent" is an adjective.

  • She has an urgent need to use the restroom.
  • Urgent pleas for help could be heard from the people trapped in the building.
  • The increasing pain from a toothache made a trip to the dentist more urgent.

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October 21, 2013

 

 

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