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Prick

prick

 

The word "prick" is used as a verb when a small amount of blood is drawn from a person:

  • The nurse pricked the man’s finger for a blood sample.
  • Diabetics prick their fingers when testing their blood for sugar levels.
  • Would you feel comfortable pricking your own finger for blood?
  • Charlene accidentally pricked her finger with a small knife while making dinner.
  • A thorn on a rose stem is sharp enough to prick a person’s finger.

This is a kit for testing blood sugar.

The word "prick" is also a form of slang. In this case, it’s a vulgar word and it has the same meaning as "jerk."

  • Why is he acting like a prick?
  • That guy is a prick.
  • Don’t be such a prick.
  • Rhonda’s boyfriend is a prick whenever he’s around her.

The word "prickly" is an adjective:

  • A cactus is a prickly plant. (It has sharp needles.)
  • Wendy got a prickly response from her supervisor this morning when she said good morning to him. (prickly = irritated; unhappy)
  • Those weeds are all prickly. You’ll need gloves to pull them out of the ground.

cactus

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November 19, 2015

 

 

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