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slam

 

To slam something is to hit it loudly or with great force.

simple past past participle
slam
slammed
slammed
  • Martha slammed the door shut to show how angry she was at her husband.
  • Please don't slam the cabinet door--you'll break it.
  • If you slam the locker door hard enough, it will close.
  • You have to slam it to close it.
  • A police officer slammed a suspect up against the wall and searched him for weapons.
  • Basketball players who are tall enough and can jump very high are able to slam a basketball through the hoop.
  • Kobe Bryant slammed the ball through the hoop.

slam

Sometimes the word "slam" is used as a noun:

  • I heard a loud slam that came from the rear of the car. (slam = a loud noise)
  • Yesterday's New York Times newspaper editorial was a slam against the President. (slam = sharp criticism)
  • James Comey's recent book is a slam against President Trump.

There are a few other ways to use the word "slam."

  • If you commit a crime, you might be sent to the slammer. (slammer = prison)
  • In the late 1970s and well into the 1980s, slam-dancing was a common form of self-expression at punk rock clubs.
  • A person who slams a drink, drinks it very quickly.
  • A poetry slam is a type of competition in which poets read their poetry in order to win against other poets.
  • A stituation that provides a great advantage might be referred to as a slam dunk (The legal case against the defendent was a slam dunk).

 

Published on April 16, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

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